TINTYPES

“In a show featuring several strong performances, Nye nearly steals the show as TR. His characters all seem possessed by an almost innocent sort of arrogance, and a clear sense of entitlement guides most of his actions. […] His moments as Roosevelt provide some of the funniest parts of the show, and it is amazing that he is able to transform so effectively into Roosevelt by simply putting on a pair of pince-nez glasses and puffing his chest up a bit.”

Tom Salitsky, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

TWELFTH NIGHT

“Especially fun is Sir Toby’s foppish idiot friend, Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Every production of Twelfth Night has its show stealer, and in this one it’s Tyler Nye’s Sir Andrew, a mincing, comically terrific buffoon afraid of his own shadow. His interactions, not only with Sir Toby and Maria, but also in sparring with Cesario, is top-notch clowning that’s belly-laugh funny.”

JK Clarke, TheaterPizzazz.com

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

“Standout performances from the company include Tyler Nye in the dual roles of Scrooge’s nephew and Fezziwig. With animated facial expressions and vocal delivery he is charmingly comic and effectively dramatic.”

Darryl Reilly, TheaterScene.net

RED

“This is a strong production of an intense two character bio-drama. […] The two actors both give very good performances. Tyler Nye as Ken can be seen to grow throughout the play, both in maturity and aesthetic sensibility. His story of his parents’ deaths is especially powerful.”

Connie Meng, North Country Public Radio

WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?

“Donna Moschek (as Honey) and Tyler Nye (as Nick) […] have the unenviable task of playing the novice faculty couple in the middle of Martha and George’s death match. Their performances are both strong enough to stand up to the sheer force of the two leads, and they balance each of the scenes with their presence while slowly revealing the darkness that lies in their future together.”

Linda Peckel, Albany Public Art Examiner

EURYDICE

“Tyler Nye is excellent as the Nasty Interesting Man and the Lord of the Underworld, in his Joker-like make-up. Oddly, he gives a believable performance of two unbelievable characters.”

Connie Meng, North Country Public Radio